Participate in Creation

books

Creating feeds the world,

                 while negativity starves it.

Four years ago, when I embarked on my personal goal of finally shaping and writing a book, there were many fears involved. Would I be able to have the self-discipline and creativity and passion and stubbornness to follow through? Would I be able to strike a work/life balance with the project, and not neglect my husband or children while achieving my goal? Was this a realistic or reasonable goal? After all, over a million books are published each year, just in the U.S., so I knew that I had stiff competition, AND a saturated field of creativity that I was walking into.

Thankfully, I set aside my fears and reservations, designed a “dream board” so that I could make a coherent and realistic timeline (and book outline), and launched my project! Along with friends and family, my main support was my husband, who encouraged me to pursue this goal, kept me motivated when I lagged behind in my timeline, and backed off when had legitimate writer’s block and just needed a break. I took summers off so I could pay attention to the (quickly changing) lives of our four kids, and spent the school year sticking to a writing schedule and editing along the way. Much research went into it, because I wanted to have a balance of anecdotal and scholarly facts that backed up the experiences that my interviewees were imparting. And my friend of 25 years, Lisa, provided photographs and cover art for me. Truly a group effort, altogether!

Please visit my author’s page at http://www.bookbirthing.wordpress.com for more backstory on the project, and also visit

on Amazon to view and purchase the Kindle version of my book! Paperback to follow, as soon as I have worked out the kinks in formatting!

Hope you enjoy it! Creativity feeds the world, while negativity starves it. Be a creator!

Advertisements

A Cup of Tea

FB_IMG_1522719415960.jpgyes, so true!

I’m not sure who wrote this, but it is so timely for me and (I hope) for you.

Women, especially, struggle with the concept of belonging. When we sense (or hear secondhand) that a sister, brother, acquaintance or coworker doesn’t like, appreciate, or accept us, we feel lots of different things: disappointment, hurt, betrayal, confusion, etc. We start to second-guess interactions we’ve had with the person, trying to discern “the moment” that we said or did whatever it was that made them change their minds about us.

This activity is the opposite of detachment.

Detachment is recognizing that we need less quantity, more quality. Less neediness, more mindfulness. Less chaos, more peace.

Someone said to me once, “It’s okay that some people don’t like you. That’s their loss, not yours.”

Less chaos, more peace.